Social Media Jobs: Honest Tea, Emerald Expositions

This week, Honest Tea is hiring a social media copywriter, while Emerald Expositions needs a social media manager. Fidelity Charitable is seeking an editor of social media and digital content, and Hunter Public Relations is looking for a social media c…

Report: 79% of Washington D.C. Insiders Use LinkedIn

Social media has the power to create information overload, regardless of the industry in which we work. However, it also provides more information than we’ve had access to before. In the fifth edition of Washington in the Information Age from the National Journal we see how Millennials, Gen-Xers, and Baby Boomers in Washington D.C. use social media, and traditional media.

A survey targeted at 1,200 Capitol Hill staff, senior-level federal executives and private sector policy professionals and examined the media attitudes of the demographics in each sector.

As smartphones have become commonplace, and more information readily available, many report experiencing information overload and fewer are report thriving in the new environment. In 2015 only 38 percent of survey respondents believe that increased media availability is making their job easier, compared to 50 percent in 2012.

Additionally, 31 percent of respondents reported themselves as thriving in the new environment, while in 2015 that dropped to 26 percent. The number of respondents feeling overwhelmed rose to 27 percent.

Trust in media sources is up across the board among D.C. professionals. While trust in traditional sources, like national news brands has increased the most, trust in social media platforms is up four percent. Online only sources like The Huffington Post gained 13 percent.

Smartphones might be responsible for the increased exposure to social and online sources of information. Larger screen displays, like those on iPhone and Android, have come to dominate the market, almost completely edging out Blackberry. Still, the Blackberry platform remains popular among older generations. Tablet adoption is also up among all demographics.

Linkedin is the most used social network by DC insiders, with 79 percent of respondents using it. 77 percent are using Facebook, 62 percent are using Twitter, and 47 percent are using YouTube. However, demographics play a large part. Among Millennials, 58 percent of Capitol Hill professionals are using Instagram and 36 percent are using Snapchat.

Federal executives, mostly Baby Boomers and older, use social media at lower rates than the other demographics across all networks except YouTube, where they equal the average.

According to National Journal Group CEO Tim Hartman:

Washington insiders continue to experiment and adopt new media platforms, but remain challenged to understand exactly what tactics and platforms are working.

This experimentation has led to rises in other networks, such as Vine and Tumblr, and it has generated more trust in a wider variety of information sources. For more information and demographic breakdowns, view the report here.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock.

KLM’s Social Efforts Generated €25 Million in 2014 — A Look Inside The Strategy

One of the biggest demerits against social marketing has been that it’s tough to prove direct return on investment.

Don’t tell that to Gert Wim ter Haar, the social media hub manager at Dutch airline KLM. His company’s social team turns irate passengers into happy brand ambassadors — generating an extra 25 million Euro last year for the company.

Wim ter Haar doesn’t see an angry customer as something to be placated or ignored, shipped to a 1-800 customer service number or a boilerplate FAQ page. He sees opportunity for great change, he told SocialTimes at the Socialbakers Engage conference in Prague:

For some companies, it’s more of a challenge to engage with the more negative ones. We really see them as an opportunity to shine. Really, (we try) to bring a customer from a negative sentiment or even a neutral or positive sentiment. We see a huge number of customers being repeat customers. Even people who started out a few years ago as negative customers or a very critical customer are now being very positive and you could almost say ambassador for our brand. Teach your teams to see negative or critical questions as a chance to shine and show what service is about.

Wim ter Haar stresses using social to truly connect with customers, inviting them to utilize Facebook, Twitter and/or LinkedIn to connect their accounts. Here’s a look at one instance when KLM was able to bypass the troubleshooting process and help a frustrated consumer, just be knowing their profile.

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KLM embraces the feedback — good and bad, Wim ter Haar said. Especially working in a vertical — airline travel — where most consumers take to social media to vent about lost baggage or delayed flights, Wim ter Haar said that going the extra mile and not being afraid can help change that sentiment.

Something else KLM also excels at is having an active presence where their consumers are, and not some where the company thinks they should be. In addition to Facebook, Twitter (where you can even book a flight), Pinterest, Google+ and LinkedIn, KLM is active on WeChat, Sina Weibo and VK.

Even if you can’t afford 24/7 customer service (and to be fair, KLM has a team of 150 people on customer service) on multiple platforms worldwide, there’s an important lesson to be learned — go where your customers are instead of worrying about which sites you should be on. Wim ter Haar discussed this with SocialTimes:

So, (we did) a lot of market research, a lot of contact with local establishments. Want to be where your customers are. If your customers in a certain country say, “No, I’m going to be on that specific platform,” you have to follow them there. … You can say, “Guys, we are present on Facebook,” but if your customers aren’t there, and they’re on another platform, it doesn’t make sense that you’re present on Facebook. You have to go where the customers are. It’s more pull marketing instead of push marketing.

The biggest takeaways:

Don’t be afraid to engage critical or angry customers. Talking with them and not just shuffling them to your website can leave a lasting impression that the customer will remember.

Study where your customers are and how they’re engaging already. Don’t invest in one platform or another just to look good, but go where your customers are already talking.

Image courtesy of KLM on Facebook.

AOL’s MapQuest Inks UI Deal With Mapbox As It Prepares To Overhaul The Product

Screen Shot 2015-05-22 at 4.38.06 PM AOL, in the process of getting acquired by Verizon for $4.4 billion, says it has no plans to divest itself of its content operations as part of that deal. But it’s not leaving them on autopilot, either. We’ve confirmed it’s planning to overhaul MapQuest, its mapping business, later this year. Read More

WARNING: Messages from ‘Facebook Recovery’ Are Scams

Facebook users: If you receive messages from an account titled “Facebook recovery,” report them at once and do not follow the directions. They are part of a scam.

Jovi Umawing of Malwarebytes Labs provided details in a blog post, saying that victims are directed to a payment page, where their credit-card information is requested.

The scam message reads (unedited):

Notification: Your Account will be Disabled!

Account FACEBOOK you have already been reported by others about the abuse of account, this is a violation of our agreement and may result in your account is disabled. Please verify your email account to unblock and help us do more for security and convenience for everyone.

Immediately do recover your Facebook account, by clicking on the link below:

“Attention”

If you ignore this message, we can not recover your account and your account will be permanently disabled.

Sorry to interrupt your convenience.

The Facebook Team

FacebookRecoveryScam

Umawing added in his blog post:

Once a user entered the credentials that were requested and clicked “Log In,” data is posted to recovery.php, and then users are redirected to this payment page, which asks for his/her full name, credit-card details and billing address.

We have no idea why all of a sudden the account that claims to be a legitimate entity from Facebook is asking for a form of monetary compensation for the recovery of accounts. Perhaps that is what the phishers meant when they said, “help us do more for security and convenience for everyone.”

If you see posts on your feed that appear similar to the Facebook post we discussed here, whether it continues to bear the same URL or not, it’s best to ignore it and warn your network about an ongoing spam campaign.

Readers: Have you seen any similar messages?

FacebookRecoveryScamPhishingPage FacebookRecoveryScamPhishingPageCreditCard

WARNING: Messages from ‘Facebook Recovery’ Are Scams

Facebook users: If you receive messages from an account titled “Facebook recovery,” report them at once and do not follow the directions. They are part of a scam.

Jovi Umawing of Malwarebytes Labs provided details in a blog post, saying that victims are directed to a payment page, where their credit-card information is requested.

The scam message reads (unedited):

Notification: Your Account will be Disabled!

Account FACEBOOK you have already been reported by others about the abuse of account, this is a violation of our agreement and may result in your account is disabled. Please verify your email account to unblock and help us do more for security and convenience for everyone.

Immediately do recover your Facebook account, by clicking on the link below:

“Attention”

If you ignore this message, we can not recover your account and your account will be permanently disabled.

Sorry to interrupt your convenience.

The Facebook Team

FacebookRecoveryScam

Umawing added in his blog post:

Once a user entered the credentials that were requested and clicked “Log In,” data is posted to recovery.php, and then users are redirected to this payment page, which asks for his/her full name, credit-card details and billing address.

We have no idea why all of a sudden the account that claims to be a legitimate entity from Facebook is asking for a form of monetary compensation for the recovery of accounts. Perhaps that is what the phishers meant when they said, “help us do more for security and convenience for everyone.”

If you see posts on your feed that appear similar to the Facebook post we discussed here, whether it continues to bear the same URL or not, it’s best to ignore it and warn your network about an ongoing spam campaign.

Readers: Have you seen any similar messages?

FacebookRecoveryScamPhishingPage FacebookRecoveryScamPhishingPageCreditCard

Stand Out: How to Build a Following That Matters

Are you wondering how to stand out in the noisy online world? Want to build your status as a thought leader? To discover new ways how to stand out, I interview Dorie Clark. More About This Show The Social Media Marketing podcast is an on-demand talk radio show from Social Media Examiner. It’s designed to […]

This post Stand Out: How to Build a Following That Matters first appeared on Social Media Examiner.
Social Media Examiner – Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

Korea’s Yello Mobile Buys Influencer Marketing Firm Gushcloud

Screenshot 2015-05-22 13.09.08(2) Yello Mobile, the Korean company that gobbled up 61 companies last year and recently raised $100 million, is always hungry for acquisitions, and it’s back at the table again after picking up Gushcloud, a Singapore-based influencer marketing platform that operates across Southeast Asia. Read More